Individualism Is a Hoax

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Angered and tired of being the mules for wealthy warmongers, indentured Whites and American Descendants of Slavery (Native Black Americans) ancestors rebelled against the one percent (Bacon’s Rebellion, 1676, Jamestown, Virginia). Since then, classism has been replaced by racism in an attempt to keep Native Black Americans from consolidating resources, materially or socially, for the benefit of their collective uplift and stability. Although great powers are invested in keeping NBA/ADOS unity fragmented now’s an optimal time to move from individualism back to collectivism in an effort to restore our family and extended family ties.

The last time American Descendants of Slavery had a semblance of control over our culture along with a sense of solidarity we created the D.A.P., an era of Dignity and Pride. It drove Native Black Americans to become creators and innovators, and pushed us to not only strengthen our family and extended family bonds, its appeal also inspired Black people around the world to say it with their chest, I’m Black and I’m Proud.

The assassination of Martin Luther king Jr, the war on drugs, and the creation of crack cocaine were orchestrated to crush and pulverize the very necessary bridges that family and fictive-kin upholds for any success that the NBA/ADOS community might have, short of federally funded reparations.

While the institution of slavery sought to annihilate the humanity of American Descendants of Slavery and failed, individualism is achieving what the institution could not – divisive forms of classism has taken root within the group, plus there’s a widening blind spot among Blacks who are generation X or younger. Wealth isn’t being transferred as one generation passes and the next steps into their shoes. Instead we’re seeing generations of poverty or at the most an individual makes it up a rung only to see their fortune stolen or lost by the time the next generation is ready to assume it or some time within the next generation’s lifetime – the fortune is no more, thus, Native Black Americans are the only ethnic group poised to live a worse quality of life than their parents. This is no coincidence. There’s a reason the NBA/ADOS community who have been tricked into thinking in terms of individualism only see their wealth circulate within their community once maybe twice while others see theirs circulate dozens and dozens of times. We’ve been hoodwinked.

Many immigrant groups rely on extended kin for help in saving money to launch migrations and to care for property and personal belongings while the migrant is away. Once in the United States, immigrants co-reside with sponsors and are provided a variety of aid including housing, meals, clothing, public transportation passes, and assistance securing employment (Bashir, 2007).

Looking at the above family solidarity model, Native Black Americans can envision what reclaiming their culture of collectivism might look like. Dignity and Pride doesn’t have to be a thing of the past with us. It does however rely on us pausing from our lifestyle of hyper-individualism to examine how much it has cost us so far, and to be brave enough to step into our collective uplift with courage.
Think about it. You’re a Native Black American and you’ve just pulled yourself up in the world and made yourself a ton of money. Knowing the social hierarchy and the history of racism in the country, who do you trust? Where do you save your money? Do you save it with Wells Fargo or Chase bank, those institutions who bankrolled slavery? Now that Johnny Cochran is gone, which law firm do you trust your life with? How do you leverage individualism in a racist landscape? Healthcare is no different. We are dying because of a racist healthcare system, not because it’s inadequate, but because as individuals we can’t defend ourselves from racism. Name and consider the amount of Black celebrities who’ve complained that they’ve almost died giving birth? Don’t let liberals or conservatives fool you – everyone else is working as a collective and it’s time that we stop getting rolled.

Rebuilding our family and extended family structures and working as a collective must be a priority on ADOS’ journey for restorative justice in the form of reparations for 400 years of sanctioned and legalized abuse.

Headcrack – Parchman Prison

Not the dice game, Cee-lo, played in the inner cities and rural America, but what I witnessed scrolling through today’s headlines, opinions and trends, is enough to make a headcrack, literally. Any sensible mind would explode if not equipped with a safety valve to diffuse and release. Public deception is a well polished working apparatus.

Trending? Trending is Drake and Future dropping a new single, and the masses of the least of these flocking to it like sheep to a flame. What are the robots drunk on? Honestly, the hardest part of writing this is having to sift through the babble in the comment section under their new video to see what’s being said about it by the mindless robots, sheep for the slaughter – lamb chops!

The song is about bitches, drugs, and money. The masses are thoroughly enthralled and seem to love it.

On the other side of reality, Black Americans are dealing with prosecutors, judges, and juries, like in Willie Nash’s case, who was originally charged with a misdemeanor, but ended up being charged and sentenced to twelve years behind bars. Mr Nash received the heavy sentence for having a cell phone. He asked a guard to charge his phone after being booked and placed in his cell. One of the staff failed to confiscate the cell phone upon entry, however the judicial system decided a dozen years in prison was appropriate, although it was the correctional facility’s error. Willie Nash is a husband and a father to three young girls. The government, and too many of our fellow citizens have little to no issue breaking up Black families, and destroying their lives. All the while our own people are obsessed with Drake and Future cursing to a beat.

Mr. Nash is hardly alone, Mississippi has the third largest prison population in the nation. Parchman prison is one of the worst in America. In the first week of January, five inmates were shanked-up and murdered. Pictures of dead and mutilated bodies were leaked to the media and family members, showing the violence and carnage which is said to be inflamed by correctional officers who provide rivals with weapons and keys to one another’s cells for ambush attacks. Staff are encouraging the violence.

Kudos to Yandy Smith from Love and Hip Hop NY for traveling from Harlem to Jackson Mississippi’s Parchman prison to raise awareness to the human rights violations that our Black brothers and sisters are experiencing in this and many other prisons and jails.

There’s a time, eh, for Future and Drake collaborations, and I’m glad that they’re ‘Living Good,’ but slinging lyrics about a lifestyle which helps to fill penitentiary beds isn’t helping Black America in 2020. This ain’t a game, it’s really life and death!